Archives for posts with tag: almond pulp


Looks great, don’t you think?  It tasted great too. My starting point for this cheesecake was a recipe on One Green Planet for Oreo Cheesecake Tartlets.  I made a couple of modifications: I’m always looking for ways to use up almond pulp (created as a by-product of the fresh almond milk that I make for my green smoothies, since I only see long-life almond milk in the shops near where I live).  So my base was around 1 cup almond pulp, 1 cup dates, cacao powder (about 3 tablespoons?) and some rolled oats, maybe 1/4 of a cup. Then I made the vanilla cream layer, as in the recipe linked above. As in many raw vegan cheesecakes, the cream is made from cashew nuts, coconut milk and flavourings. I didn’t have cacao butter so I substituted melted coconut oil.

But I was too lazy to make the chocolate ganache drizzle that they suggested in the recipe, so I simply topped the cheesecake with fresh strawberries when serving. I think the freshness of the strawberries added a nice element to the dessert.

Instead of tartlets, I used an 8 inch round springform cake tin, lightly greased and lined. As you see, there was enough base for a decent layer on the bottom and up the sides, and luckily, the vanilla filling came up to pretty much exactly the right height! If you haven’t made a raw cheesecake before then (you definitely should and) I should probably mention that after putting the base and filling together, the cheesecake goes in the freezer to firm up. When serving, cutting it while it’s quite frozen helps keep the base together, but I prefer to let it soften up for at least 10 minutes before eating it.


Just about every week I make a batch of fruity seedy biscuits, to use up almond pulp from homemade almond milk. I posted a recipe last year, but thought I’d give you an updated recipe to show you the variation which has become my favourite: the short version is that it involves cocoa powder, dates and some cranberries.   With no added sugar, these biscuits  are tasty little slow-release energy bombs to power me through busy afternoons at work.


These go into the food processor:

  • pulp from 1 cup of almonds (leftover from making almond milk)
  • 1/2 cup self-raising flour
  • 1/2 cup dried fruit: I like medjool dates with a couple of tablespoons of cranberries
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • about 3 tablespoons raw cacoa powder (or cocoa powder)
  • pinch of salt

These are mixed in later:

  • 1/4 cup rolled oats,
  • 1/4 cup mixed seeds (I use pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds),
  • 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil or canola oil,
  • 1 tablespoon of apple sauce (or more if the mixture needs help sticking together)


Preheat the oven to 180 C/350 F.  Line a baking tray with baking paper.

Place the almond pulp, flour, baking powder, cacao/coca powder and salt in a food processor. If the dates are soft they can go straight into the processor: otherwise, soak them and the cranberries in some warm water for a couple of minutes to soften, then drain and add to the processor.

Process the mixture until the fruit is broken up and the mixture starts to clump together. The mixture should be moist and hold together if you press it.

Transfer the mixture to a large bowl and add the remaining ingredients.  Mix well: I usually use my hands, to work the moisture through the mixture evenly.  Form the mixture into a big ball.

From the ball of mixture, rip off biscuit-sized pieces and roll into balls, squish down a bit, and put on the baking tray. Bake for about 8 – 10 minutes or so, until they are starting to brown on top. Leave to cool on the tray for a couple of minutes, then transfer onto a cooling rack.


Well, this changes everything! I’m always looking out for ways to use the almond pulp that is the by-product of home-made almond milk. It was really hot last week and I didn’t feel like baking my fruity seedy almond pulp biscuits. In fact, I was craving mini raw vegan cheesecake. Suddenly I thought, why don’t I try making the base with almond pulp, instead of almonds? Dear reader, it worked!

So now I have another option for using up almond pulp: my guess is that this substitution should work for most raw vegan dessert recipes which involve nuts and dates as a biscuity base. My reasoning here is that the dates provide the moisture that holds everything together, and the nuts are there to provide bulk and protein, which is still there in the almond pulp. Hooray!

Almond pulp crackers 

Since starting to make my own almond milk, I’ve been on the lookout for ways to use the resulting almond pulp. These almond pulp crackers are very tasty and easy to make (shown here with beetroot dip). I’ve also made almond pulp hummus, which was fun. If you have any favourite ways to use almond pulp, please leave a comment below!