Kid #1 really likes blueberry bagels. We used to be able to buy them from our local supermarket, but they don’t seem to stock them anymore. Finally I realised that we could try to make some ourselves. We found a recipe online and today we had a go.

I made a few mistakes.  The first mistake was thinking “Sure, this packet of yeast is old but it will probably still work” (!!).  The yeast produced some bubbles after 5 minutes in warm water with sugar, so I decided to use it, but now I think it probably wasn’t up to full strength. Either that, or mistake #2 finished it off: I used frozen blueberries but they were still (very) cold when they went into the dough. That might not have been a great idea. (I’d read that it was fine to use frozen blueberries but that you should get them out an hour in advance. We didn’t wait an hour. Maybe 20 minutes. Oops.)

So, when I make these again, I’ll use freshly bought yeast and room temperature blueberries (fresh or defrosted). But even so, they were tasty, if a bit flatter and crispier than expected. We enjoyed them.


We live down the road from the Ramsgate Foodies Market but we haven’t been there for a while. This morning child #1 suggested that we go there for (a late) breakfast. We cycled to the market and walked around deciding what to eat. I couldn’t resist the humitas from the Pochito Chilean Street Food stall.  (They mostly sell omni food, but the humitas is vegan.)

Humitas is mostly made with fresh corn and onion, ground into a paste andwrapped up in corn husks, then boiled.  This page has a recipe for humitas and also tells us that “Humitas are one of the classic pre-Columbian foods of Latin America”. I found my humitas very tasty, especially with the coriander salsa on top. It was a very good way to start the day.

Pochito Chilean Street Food


This is the mousse part of Dreena Burton’s Raw Chocolate Dream Mousse Pie, from Let Them Eat Vegan. It is the first time I have made a chocolate mousse that contains the secret ingredient…. <whispers> avocado. For some reason, my high speed blender didn’t completely obliterate the texture from the soaked cashews: you can see some graininess in the photo. But this tasted good as a chocolately dessert.

OMG: have a look at the date of this post and the date of Dreena Burton’s post that I linked to in the previous paragraph!  That’s a completely unprepared coincidence, I promise you. Exactly 5 years from her recipe post to mine.  And that reminds me: a week ago it was my 5th anniversary as a vegan. Hooray!


Last month, dear reader, I went to Melbourne. While there I ate two delicious meals. The first, pictured above, was eaten at Handsome Her in Brunswick. The food was gorgeous: this dish is called the Park Yeon-Mi. I quote from the menu: “Charcohl bubble waffle with crispy drumsticks, cucumber kimchi, turmeric infused daikon, pickled carrots, Korean sweet and spicy sauce, tofu emulsion and rainbow slaw”.  Wow. It was quite amazing. I think the drumsticks are tofu-based (?).


The decor at Handsome Her is pretty amazing too.


The next day, brunch at Ray’s Cafe. (A poem.) I had the Hash Savage: scrambled tofu, smoked lebanese eggplant, smashed peas etc. Very tasty.


The Grizzly Beer Fries with BBQ pulled jackfruit and miso cheese was also quite delicious. I think I’d go back just for these fries.


This gorgeous plate of vegan (tofu-based) fish and chips was lovingly prepared for us by the good people of The Ship Inn at Ouseburn in Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK.


This pub switched to an all-vegan menu at some point in the recent past (last couple of years) and this was our first visit. They also had several vegan beers on tap. As well as the fish and chips, which my partner greatly enjoyed, another member of our party sampled the Lucky Taco (below)…


… and I had the Aloha Teriyaki Burger, which was very tasty.


Great vegan food, relaxed atmosphere, dog-friendly, and with a cool exterior. I definitely hope to eat here again and highly recommend that you drop by, next time you’re in the north-east of England.




Happy New Year everyone!  This year we are in the UK for four weeks, visiting my in-laws in the UK for Christmas and New Year (as we do every two years). Tonight I decided that I should contribute some dessert, but I didn’t have much time or energy for anything fancy. My husband suggested just fruit and icecream, and I was thinking of halving some strawberries (as I said, not a lot of time or energy!). The supermarket didn’t have any strawberries, but did have lots of lovely raspberries. So we ended up with this very simple dessert: some lovely vegan icecream called Swedish Glace, some raspberry sauce (see below) and a few fresh raspberries on top.  Very simple, fiendlishly effective. (In other words, it was really yummy.)

For the raspberry sauce, just put a punnet of raspberries in a saucepan with a little water, over a low heat. Add a tablespoon or two of brown sugar, to taste. After 10 minutes or so, the raspberries will collapse into a lovely mush: you only need to stir occasionally. When you’re happy with the consistency, take it off the heat and let it cool: we ate ours at just above room temperature. You can strain the seeds out if you’re really keen, but I didn’t bother. Really easy, full of flavour.


I have just come to the end of a really, *really* busy couple of weeks at work. I haven’t got any photos of lovely food that I’ve made recently, mostly because the food I’ve made recently has all been stuff that I’ve posted about here before.

But I’ve had this photo sitting around, waiting to have its moment in the sun. That moment is now. This is from lunch at Sweet Bones in Canberra… from back in July. We spent a few days in Thredbo with my sister’s family, and I jumped at the chance to have lunch at Sweet Bones on the way home, to show my partner and kids why I love to eat here whenever I can, usually when I visit ANU.

My lunch (pictured) was, I believe, their Tempeh Reuben. I definitely remember that it was delicious. I have praised Sweet Bones before and I bet I’ll praise them again.  The only problem with Sweet Bones is that they are so popular, you usually have to wait for a table. But it’s worth it.